We played Tales from the Loop

This weekend, I invited a few friends to playtest Tales from the Loop with me. I already had a first exposure to the game during the annual new years gaming bash at Spielefeld, but that was with the Alpha version, and as a player. This time I was the referee, which always is wholly different experience.

Despite having set the date two weeks in advance, I actually did only minimal preparation: One skim-read of the whole rulebook, one reading of the Mystery and..

..yes, that was it in the end. The only extra mile I went was adding small post-it bookmarks to the rulebook, so I could quickly find relevant sections during play.

(Really, I cannot recommend these things enough. Colour-coding is quite enough, no need to name them. In this case, yellow is rules and red is the Mystery. And that is really one of my main gripes with the Rulebook: The really awesome pictures are too scattered, and not easy to find when you want to show something to the players. Guess I’ll need another set of bookmarks for that.)

What really hooked me as a Gamemaster were the tenets of the game. First there are three that set the tone of the setting:

  • Your home town is full of strange and fantastic things
  • Everyday life is dull and unforgiving
  • Adults are out of reach and out of touch

Keeping to these tenets ensures that the Mystery will feel exciting, will give the Kids a reason to investigate and get into danger. After all, adults are no help, and everything is better than this boring everyday life.

And then, this is how you should play the game:

  • The land of the Loop is dangerous, but kids will not die
  • The game is played scene by scene
  • The world is described collaboratively

This lets the players know what is expected of them, how things will flow, and what kind of risks they can take.

Most of the players immediately got into the rules of the kids, enjoying the hot summer in sweden. They swam in the sea, agonized over the harsh decisions made by their parents („take your little brother with you!“) and generally had fun.

(By the way: It does help if your players are old enough to remember the 80ies. One of mine isn’t, and occasionally had to be reminded on what already existed and what didn’t.)

The Mystery itself was taken directly from the Rulebook, „Summer Break and Killer Birds“, and it went, as far as I am concerned really well. It seems quite linear at first glance, but it actually is akin to a sandbox: There are a few locations and NPCs, as well as a countdown of events that will happen if the kids don’t intervene. The NPCs and locations contain pointers to one or more others. If the kids follow these pointers they will invariably end up at the showdown, but it doesn’t feel scripted, and there are many different possible paths and support for a lot of freewheeling in between.

My other gripe with the rules is the Showdown / Extended Trouble concept. It is very similar to the Wrap-Up in Leverage, but Tales from the Loop isn’t as meta as Leverage, so it the Extended Trouble sticks out a bit mechanically. The general idea is that the Gamemaster sets a threat level and then all the kids have to roll a skill check — if the total number of sixes is equal to or higher than that threat level, they win. What exactly they roll for is determined by the narration, and then the die rolls tell you how exactly they won (or lost).

It works, but you move a bit out of the viewpoint of the kids doing it, which is a shame. Still, it does work, and the resulting showdown felt rewarding enough. As rewarding as the other half of the ending was frustrating to them: In the end believed the kids anything, and instead of being lauded as heroes, they had to evade a severe scolding by several policemen!

I’m looking forward to the next session („Grown-up Attraction“) and already have made some notes on what to improve:

  • Tales from the Loop benefits from aggresive scene framing by the gamemaster. You really want to make sure that the players don’t overthink things, and also have them experience the dull everyday life as a contrast occasionally.
  • Having sample pictures bookmarked. Often enough you want to show off some scenery or vehicles, and having to browse through the book for that disrupts the flow
  • more background 80ies music!
  • I should also encourage the kids to take care of their conditions. That’ll slow them down a bit, instead of rushing from location to location. It also gives them a reason to play through their relationships and interact with adults.

I am on Mastodon now

Those who know me, are aware that I am some sort of Hipster. As such, I of course have to be ahead of all the latest trends and topics de jour. In social media, that means that I of course need to have a Mastodon handle. In case you haven’t heard of Mastodon, here’s a short summary:

  • Mastodon is a microblogging service based on GNU-Social
  • Everyone can set up their own instance and then federate with other instances to create a global network
  • Identities are only unique within their instance. Same as email really, where you can have the same name on several domains.

So, what makes this different than, say Identi​.ca, Diaspora and similar things? For once, it already looks much more polished than Diaspora. And then it also manages to overcome quite a lot of the shortcomings that are inherent to the Twitter-clones:

  • There is an expanded limit of 500 characters for each „toot“. That is wordy enough for me.
  • There are two extra timelines that you can see — everyone on the same Instance and everyone else who is somehow connected to the people in your instance. That ensures that you see things happening and get connected to folks right from the start.
  • The federation system gets rid of the pesky free-speech vs moderation clash. More on that later.

So, what is it with the three timelines and the federation system? The basic setup is this: You have a home timeline, which shows everything from those folks you actively follow. You can follow users on your own instance, as well as those who are on any instance that is federated with the one you’re on. That basically means everyone, unless their instance is viewed as so toxic and bad that your admin has decided to get rid of them altogether. In effect, the Home timeline is what you’re used from all the other social networks.

On top of that, you have a „Local“ timeline. That list shows all the activity from everyone who is a user on the same instance as you. This immediately shows one reason why it is important to choose the correct instance to have your account in: If the instance you join is full of gaming nerds, you will have a very different experience than if it would be full of artists or political activists.

The third timeline is the Federated one. Here you basically see everyone who isn’t local or in your home stream, but somehow connected to one of those people. Friends of a friend so to speak. The exact rules are a bit more complicated, but that is the gist of it.

I really cannot stress how useful I found these extra two timelines. While I have no idea how many people are on the same instance as I am (octodon.local, chosen because the about page is simply spot on to my worldview.),  it apparently is exactly the right size: The local stream is busy, but not too busy. And as a result, people take the time to chime into conversations there and answer open questions. On other social networks, those questions would probably either not be seen, or drowned in the sea of everything else.

Now, with every new tech project, there are of course immediate philosophical differences: One of them is the use of FollowerBots. Those are bits of software that simply follow every person on a different instance that they learn of, making sure that the activity of those people becomes visible in the instance of that bot. As an end result, the bots aim to change the behaviour of that Federated timeline from showing friends-of-friends only to showing everyone. Personally, I am not yet sure if I like this. The upside is that if this bothers you, you can for example join an instance that blocks those bots.

The other issue seems to revolve around censorship and free speech. My own stance is that you can say what you want, but not everyone is required to listen to you. And the federation system of Mastodon allows for exactly this: Everyone can set up their own instance, and everyone can give being heard a good shot. But if you spout stuff that upsets people, they can make sure that you don’t show up in their timeline.

(You should be aware though, that the whole Mastodon concept is not very privacy-oriented. There are lots of loopholes and pitfalls, and server admins can usually read everything on their instance if they absolutely want to.)

Still, the whole Federation system allows for a wide variety of needs on the whole free-speech-vs-censorship spectrum. And that allowance in turn fosters a discussion about these very things, with the results of that discussion ending up in the code and settings of the various instances. (keep in mind that the whole thing is open source after all!)

I think I’ll use Mastodon for most of my daily status update needs for a week or so now, to see where I end up with this. See the results here: https://octodon.social/@JollyOrc

Why I don’t identify as sysadmin anymore

I used to be a sysadmin. And I like to think that I was pretty good at my job. These days, my work is much more managerial with a strong emphasis on communication. The command line and I only meet occasionally, and I have to get help whenever I do something more complicated with regular expressions. Still, I apparently have retained enough skills that the Head of Cloud Operations at my current workplace occasionally says things like „oh, you can do that?“ in a positively surprised tone. But I usually do know my limits and what not to touch.

This is the story of when I failed to recognize my limits.

Knowing that I’m not an admin, this webpage resides on a server that is run by a webhosting company. They worry over security patches, uptime, sensible database configuration and so on, because I know that I’ll probably screw this up. I am allowing myself to change database tables, tinker with some of the htaccess settings and… DNS. That is one of those things that I don’t touch a lot, as there is no need for this on a daily basis.

And thus, I completely forgot about the SPF record when changing the MX entries to support my G Suite setup when I switched hosting last year. As a quick recap, let me quote Google what it’s about:

The purpose of an SPF record is to prevent spammers from sending messages with forged From addresses at your domain. Recipients can refer to the SPF record to determine whether a message purporting to be from your domain comes from an authorized mail server.

Quite the important and nifty functionality. I actually knew of it already, but didn’t realize that the new webhoster had this implemented as a standard. So while I successfully switched all the MX entries, I overlooked the SPF setting.

Alas, there are a lot of email servers that happily ignore a faulty SPF setting, even Google kept receiving emails despite the wrong setting. And you don’t really get an error message on the senders part, because no one talks back to (even only suspected) spammers. So nearly everything seemed fine: I was sending and receiving mails on a daily basis and this configuration error wasn’t discovered for nearly half a year. Only when I started to worry that one email recipient didn’t answer at all and a friend who actually is an admin looked into the matter for me.

So, the lesson here is: The Dunning Kruger effect is sometimes closer to home than you think. Whenever you do something only occasionally, maybe talk to someone who does it regularly, to make sure that technology hasn’t advanced past your own experience in the meantime. And if you use G Suite, here's how to set the SPF correctly.

Abenteuer. #6 ist da!

Hin und wieder bin ich ja auch produktiv fürs Fandom tätig. Selten genug, aber in den letzten Jahren kommt der geordnete Output meist über das „Abenteuer. “ Fanzine. Gespieltes Material von Fans für Fans — und eben gezielt für den nächsten Spieltisch. Mitmachen kann jeder, solange man denn zwei Peers findet, die für die Qualität geradestehen wollen.

Im Ergebnis finden sich da Beiträge, die mindestens drei Leute cool finden, und mindestens die einreichende Person hat das in der Regel sogar irgendwie schon gewinnbringend im Spiel eingesetzt. Die Beiträge reichen dann quer durch alle Genres. Natürlich ist da ein Old-School Einschlag zu spüren. Und natürlich ist das alles hoffnungslos unprofessionell, wir reden schließlich über ein (mit Liebe gemachtes) Fanzine.

Und nun, nach langer Pause, ist es wieder da: Abenteuer. #6 liegt als Print-on-Demand und PDF bereit! Und die 93 Seiten sind prall gefüllt:

  • Gemüse Goul — Schlachttabelle für die Antike
    Was passiert denn so auf einem antiken Schlachtfeld?
  • Benjamin Förstera — Vier Talismane aus der 5. Sphäre
    Vier Gegenstände als Beute, Handelsware oder McGuffin!
  • Tobias Deißler — Zu Künzelsau geboren…
    Knapp zu spät, aber was solls: Ein Weihnachtsabenteuer
  • Harald Wagener — Uploads
    Eine SF Setting Miszelle
  • von mir — The Malitia Incident
    Sexploitation Hollowpoint in den 70ern
  • Paolo Greco und Harald Wagener — DAS: Finten, Kniffe & Tricks
    Kampfoptionen fürs OSR DSA
  • Tobias Deißler — Die Gilde der Purpurkammer in Thalassa
    Eine Ortsbeschreibung
  • Thomas Jetzfellner — Schlachtfeldereignisse im Blutkrieg
    Wenn Teufel gegen Dämonen kämpfen…

Mein Beitrag war ursprünglich mal ein Intermezzo meiner See der Tausend Insel Kampagne, das ich vor einiger Zeit anläßlich eines Spielefeld-Kuschelcons kurzerhand weitgehend umschrieb und nach Hollowpoint konvertierte. The Malitia Incident hat dabei gleich mehrere der dort anwesenden Spieler inspiriert, sich auch Hollowpoint zuzulegen.

Wer bei der #7 mitmischen will, findet das autorenkollektiv im Disputorium auf forum.rsp-blogs.de.